CaringSmiles 4u | Restorative Treatment in Indianapolis

                Juanita R. Taylor, DDS

                                        4615 Lafayette Rd.  Suite B
                                     Indianapolis, IN 46254

317-968-9700

Restorative Treatment
 

 

Fillings

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We offer white fillings (resins) and alloys (silver) fillings depending on the depth of the decay and the ability to obtain a dry working field.  Resins are tooth colored restorations and offer better esthetics (appearance) but proper hygiene is even more important for the longevity of the restorations. 

Composite Bonding

Bonding (use of resins) is a common solution for:

  • Fixing or repairing chipped or cracked teeth
  • Reducing unsightly gaps or spaces between teeth
  • Hiding discoloration or faded areas on the tooth’s surface

 

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Bonding is often used to improve the appearance of your teeth and enhance your smile. As the name indicates, composite material, either a plastic or resin, is bonded to an existing tooth. Unlike veneers or crowns, composite bonding removes little, if any, of the original tooth.

Composite bonding has many advantages:

  • It is a quick process.
  • It does not reduce the tooth’s original structure and is relatively inexpensive.
  • Composite resins come in many different shades and provide better matching of shades to the natural color of your teeth.
  • Composite bonds, however, are not as durable and long-lasting as veneers and crowns and may need to be re-touched or replaced in the future.

 

Composite bonds stain more easily and therefore require proper care and regular cleaning. In order to ensure the longest possible duration of the bonding, composites should be brushed and flossed daily. Common staining elements include coffee, tea, tobacco, foods and candy.

 

Root Canal

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The pulp of a tooth is the inner central core of the tooth.  The pulp contains nerves, blood vessels, connective tissue and reparative cells.  The purpose of pulp therapy is to maintain the vitality of the affected tooth (so the tooth is not lost).

Dental caries (cavities) and traumatic injury are the main reasons for a tooth to require pulp therapy.  Pulp therapy is often referred to as a “nerve treatment,” “children’s root canal,” “pulpectomy” or “pulpotomy.”  The two common forms of pulp therapy in children’s teeth are the pulpotomy and pulpectomy.

A pulpotomy removes the diseased pulp tissue within the crown portion of the tooth.  Next, an agent is placed to prevent bacterial growth and to calm the remaining nerve tissue.  This is followed by a final restoration (usually a stainless steel crown).

A pulpectomy is required when the entire pulp is involved (into the root canal(s) of the tooth).  During this treatment, the diseased pulp tissue is completely removed from both the crown and root.  The canals are cleansed, disinfected and in the case of primary teeth, filled with a resorbable material.  Then a final restoration is placed.  A permanent tooth would be filled with a non-resorbing material.

A root canal is a procedure that extracts decayed pulp (nerve and blood supply) from the central part of the adult tooth, reshapes the canal and replaces it with strengthening filler.  It is warranted when the cavity burrowed into the deeper reaches of the tooth, causing extensive damage to tooth structure. When the damage goes beyond what can be treated with a filling, dentists can perform a root canal (or endodontics), preserving the tooth and retaining its original integrity; thereby, saving a tooth that in the past would have to have been pulled.

 

Crowns

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A crown is a permanent covering that fits over an original tooth that is decayed, damaged or cracked. Crowns are made of a variety of different materials such as porcelain, gold, acrylic resin or a mix of these materials. Porcelain generally has the most natural appearance, although it is often less durable.

This process generally consists of a minimum of 2-3 visits over a three to four week period.  Once the procedure is completed, proper dental hygiene, including daily brushing and flossing, is required to maintain healthy, bacteria-free teeth, gums and crowns. This helps in the prevention of gum disease. Given proper care, your crowns can last a lifetime.

Stainless steel crowns may also be recommended for permanent or primary teeth, depending on the size, depth, and location of decay.  Also, it is recommended to have a crown placed following a root canal or pulpotomy. 

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For the anterior primary teeth, we offer Nu Smile crowns which are more esthetic.  They have porcelain coverage on the front of the crown and stainless steal to the posterior side.  There is also an option of resin crowns which are a white covering.  

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